In the recent Orient Way Corp. v. Tp. of Lyndhurst (35-2-4760) decision, the Appellate Division upheld the Tax Court’s determination that an arms’ length sale of the subject contaminated property provided credible evidence of true market value. The import of this decision is that where an arms’ length transaction exists, the reliance on the highly subjective process of determining the appropriate deduction to be applied to the value of the property as if “clean” (free from contamination) can now be avoided. As confirmed by a long line of cases, discussed in a previous piece I authored, the valuation methodology in this area requires satisfaction of three critical components:

  • First, the taxpayer needs to establish the appropriate amount of the cleanup costs required to return the property to a “clean” state
  • Second, the taxpayer must establish the reasonable period required to complete the cleanup
  • Third proof must be offered establishing that there has been a cessation of the cause of the property contamination

Once these three elements are satisfied, the cleanup costs can then be capitalized over the expected cleanup period to determine the amount of the appropriate deduction to apply when fixing a final true value for the property in its current contaminated state. While these proofs will undoubtedly continue to be required, the holding in Orient Way makes plain that our courts will now have the ability to afford great weight to an arms’ length sale of the property where the parties were acting with full knowledge of the existing contamination. As the Tax Court recognized in the case below, the impact of the cleanup obligations will have been appropriately built into the sales price and therefore this price will represent the best indicator of the value of the property in its contaminated state.