Construction & Design Agreements

The New York City Building Code, Chapter 33, requires a developer to safeguard adjoining property during the conduct of all construction and demolition operations. Accordingly, a developer and an adjoining property owner may enter into a license agreement, whereby the adjoining property owner provides the developer with access to its property to install Code-required

Last week, New Jersey’s Appellate Division re-affirmed the principle that a court must strictly apply the terms of a construction contract when determining a dispute between contracting parties.  Where the contract terms speak directly to the issue in dispute, a court may not employ equitable considerations to determine the dispute even if the court believes

Until 1990, federal law extended copyright protection to original architectural drawings, but generally did not extend such protection to actual buildings, even buildings constructed from protected drawings.  The drawings were protected from copying as “pictorial” or “graphic” works, just like any sketch or painting.  The drawings only had to have a minimal degree of originality

The U.S. Green Building Council, on April 27, 2009, implemented changes to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design or LEED, the country’s most popular and recognizable green building rating system. The revised rating system, known as LEED 2009, contains several significant changes affecting developers who previously operated under the old system. LEED 2009 also features

A widely held assumption among project owners and construction contractors is that private arbitration is faster and more cost effective than litigation of a dispute in the courts. The inclusion of mandatory arbitration of disputes in all AIA construction contracts since their inception in 1888 was premised on this assumption. Unfortunately, as many owners and