So, you properly file your construction lien claim within the time allowed by the New Jersey Construction Lien Law (“CLL”), and then timely send out a copy of the lien by certified and ordinary mail to the address of the condominium building where you performed your work.  All set, right?  Not so fast, according to

So you’ve managed to successfully file a construction lien claim in New Jersey.  Well, don’t then kick back and relax for too long, because if you fail to take action to enforce that lien claim within the limited time required by statute, the lien will be rendered unenforceable.  Under the New Jersey Construction Lien Law

The right to file a mechanic’s lien is established by state statute, allowing those providing work, services, materials or equipment to a construction project with additional valuable security in the event of non-payment of amounts due under a contract for such work, services, materials or equipment.  As a pair of recent unpublished New Jersey Appellate

In L&W Supply Corp. v. Joe DeSilva, et al., (Docket No. A-2960-10T2, December 19, 2012) (“L&W Supply”), a decision recently approved for publication, the Appellate Division provides guidance to material suppliers seeking to file construction lien claims.  The court held that, in certain circumstances, a material supplier must make further inquiry and

Join us on November 10, at the NJ office of Cole Schotz or online by webinar, for an in-depth update on New Jersey Construction Lien Law.

Hear the latest on:

  • Construction Liens on Commercial Projects
  • Construction Liens on Residential Projects
  • Proposed Construction Lien Law Revision
  • Priority of Construction Liens and Mortgage
  • Construction and Permanent Financing
  • Title Insurance