We last wrote in May 2019 (updating an earlier post written in February 2018) that the New York State Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, issued a landmark decision affirming the Appellate Division, Second Department’s decision in 159 MP Corp. v. Redbridge Bedford, LLC to uphold a commercial tenant’s waiver of its right to

In a landmark decision, the Court of Appeals, New York State’s  highest court, has endorsed a commercial tenant’s waiver of its right to seek a “Yellowstone” injunction, perhaps sounding the ultimate death knell for this common remedy  for commercial tenants who are facing claims of default from their landlords. A Yellowstone injunction enables a tenant

Commercial landlords can now add another item to the already interminable list of risks they face in their capacities as landlords: liability borne from a tenant’s trademark infringement. The notion that a landlord could be vulnerable to legal action for the actions of its tenant runs counter to many people’s understanding of fairness. Nevertheless, commercial

The ability to obtain a “Yellowstone” injunction has long been a saving grace for commercial tenants faced with a disputed default under their lease. A recent decision of the New York State Appellate Division, however, could shift the balance of power in commercial landlord/tenant relationships.

Typically, when a landlord notifies a tenant of an alleged

The New York City Building Code, Chapter 33, requires a developer to safeguard adjoining property during the conduct of all construction and demolition operations. Accordingly, a developer and an adjoining property owner may enter into a license agreement, whereby the adjoining property owner provides the developer with access to its property to install Code-required